keel effect

Depending upon the action of the relative wind on the side area of the airplane fuselage, in a slight slip the fuselage provides a broad area upon which the relative wind strikes, forcing the fuselage to become parallel to the wind. This is known as a keel effect. This effect aids in the lateral stability of the aircraft.

Aviation dictionary. 2014.

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